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Home Research Topics Scene Viewing Schütt, Rothkegel, Trukenbrod, Wichmann, & Engbert (Journal of Vision, 2018). Potsdam Scene Viewing Corpus

Schütt, Rothkegel, Trukenbrod, Wichmann, & Engbert (Journal of Vision, 2018). Potsdam Scene Viewing Corpus

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The data for the Potsdam Scene Viewing Corpus can be found in an OSF repository under

 

www.doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/N3BYQ

 

In this OSF repository you will find fixation data, images and a corresponding readme-file.

Please refer to the following article when using the data or for more information:

Schütt, H. H., Rothkegel, L. O., Trukenbrod, H. A., Engbert, R., & Wichmann, F. A. (2018). Disentangling top-down vs. bottom-up and low-level vs. high-level influences on eye movements over time. arXiv preprint arXiv:1803.07352.

The data in the OSF repository come from a large scene-viewing experiment with 105 participants and 90 images.

As images we used photographs taken by the authors, which did not contain text or humans that stand out prominently. Furthermore, images were selected as 6 subsets of 15 images each: The first contained photographs of texture-like patterns, the other 5 contained typical holiday photographs with the prominent structure either at the top, left, bottom, right or center. The full set of images is available online with the dataset.

Eye movements for our scene viewing experiment were collected in two sessions. In each session 60 images were presented and participants were instructed to memorise them for a subsequent test, to report which images they had seen. In the first session all images were new. In the second session we repeated 30 images from the first session and showed the remaining 30 new images. The 30 repeated images were the same for each observer. Trials began with a black fixation cross presented on a grey background. After successful binocular fixation in a square with a side length of 2.2°  the stimulus appeared and subjects had 10 seconds to explore the image. In the memory test participants had to indicate for 120 images if they had seen it before. Half the images were the ones they saw in the experiment, the other half were chosen randomly from another pool of 90 images we chose according to the same criteria as the images used for the first set of images.

The three cohorts of subjects differed in the placement of the fixation cross and whether the images were shown in colour or in greyscale:

 

  • For the first 35 subjects we presented the images in greyscale and placed the start position randomly within a doughnut-shape around the center of the screen and stimulus, with an inner radius of 100px = 2.6° and an outer radius of 300px = 7.8°.
  • For the second group of 35 subjects the images were also presented in greyscale, but the start position was chosen randomly from only 5 positions: The image center and 20% of the monitorsize (256/205 pixels, 5.68/4.55 degree of visual angle) away from the border of the monitor at the top, left, bottom and right, centrally in the other dimension.
  • For the final group of 35 subjects the images were shown in colour and the starting position was as for the second group. 

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Last Updated on Thursday, 06 December 2018 15:37  

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